seafloor

Seafloor microplastic hotspots controlled by deep-sea currents

Simplified graphic showing how seafloor currents create microplastics hotspots in the deep-sea

New research has revealed the highest levels of microplastic yet recorded on the seafloor, with up to 1.9 million pieces in an area of just one square metre.

New insights into the transportation of microplastics across the deep seafloor

Turbidity currents transport coastal microplastics from shelf to deep-sea.

National Oceanography Centre (NOC) research has revealed for the first time how submarine sediment avalanches can transport microplastics from land into the deep ocean.

The study also revealed that these flows are responsible for sorting different types of microplastics – burying some, and moving others vast distances across the sea floor.

Microplastics accumulate in hotspots for deep-sea life

This diagram shows the likely sources, pathways and accumulation points for microplastics in the ocean.

Research published earlier in the week reveals that microplastics often accumulate on the deep sea floor in the same place as diverse and dense marine life communities.

Marine Life Talks in Southampton – 1 November 2018

Ben Robinson

Exploring the Antarctic Seafloor: why I spent three years on the frozen continent

Global project to map ocean floor by 2030 gets underway

The Nippon Foundation this week announced that the Nippon Foundation-GEBCO (General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans) Seabed 2030 project is now under way.

Antarctica’s first whale skeleton found with nine new deep-sea species

Backbone of whale skeleton on seafloor (courtesy of NERC)

Marine biologists have, for the first time, found a whale skeleton on the ocean floor near Antarctica, giving new insights into life in the sea depths. The discovery was made almost a mile below the surface in an undersea crater and includes the find of at least nine new species of deep-sea organisms thriving on the bones.

Golden plumes from deep Earth

Earth’s interior structure (Courtesy: Planet Earth Online)

Plumes of hot rock from deep within the Earth are lacing rock beneath the Atlantic Ocean with gold, scientists have discovered.