climate change

Climate change will alter waves along half the world’s coast

Image from Dan Grinwis

New research finds that a warming planet will also alter ocean waves along more than 50% of the world’s coastlines. This research, published in Nature Climate Change, has significant implications for coastal flooding and erosion.

Correcting historic sea surface temperature measurements reveals a simpler pattern of ocean warming

NOC scientists Dr David Berry and Dr Elizabeth Kent have contributed to solving an enduring mystery in climate science – why did different oceans around the world apparently warm and cool at different rates in the early 20th century?

World first experiment will provide confidence in sub-seabed carbon dioxide storage

This week the RRS James Cook set sail to embark on a world-first experiment to develop methods for detecting and monitoring leaks of carbon dioxide (CO2) from sub-seabed reservoirs, however unlikely they are to occur.

NOC sensors reveal that melting ice sheets release tons of methane into the atmosphere

Ice

Results of a recent paper published in Nature reveal that ice sheets overlying extensive wetlands can release tons of methane to the atmosphere through subglacial rivers.

Impacts of marine climate change demonstrated by decade of scientific collaboration

NOC scientists have contributed to a major new publication by the UK Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership (MCCIP), which demonstrates the effects climate change is having on UK seas and coastlines.

Seafloor communities may have it worse under climate change

New findings from researchers at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) indicate that seafloor communities will be more impacted by climate change the deeper they are in the ocean.

Global climatic change prompts marine life to go on the move

How global climate change will alter the ocean and ecosystems at the heart of global food security over the 21st century has been highlighted by a trio of ground-breaking research papers.

The Ocean’s future is stressful

A NOC-led study, published in Nature Communications, finds that with just 15 more years of current emissions, over half of the world’s ocean will be exposed to more than one source of stress, affecting everything from the tiniest plants to the mightiest whales. By 2050, that figure rises to around 86% of the ocean.

New project to study the impacts of climate change on Arctic ecosystems

A new project will investigate how climate-driven changes affect two top Arctic predators, the Harp and Ringed seals, as well as the base of the Arctic food web.

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