Antarctica

Marine Life Talk at NOC in Southampton

Marine Life Talk

Thursday, 4 May 2017

Life under the ice: How we monitor and manage marine life in Antarctica

20th Anniversary Henry Charnock Lecture

Bess B Ward

9 October 2015 – Nitrogen cycling in the oxygen minimum zone

Bess B Ward

Oxygen minimum zones form in a few special regions of the ocean due to the confluence of high productivity waters (usually fed by upwelling) and slow midwater ventilation.  In these regions, depth intervals several hundred meters thick are completely devoid of oxygen.  

Antarctic fjords are diversity hotspots in a rapidly warming region

Andvord Bay, Antarctica – fjord hotspot of seafloor marine life (credit: Craig Smith, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa)

Rapid climate change is threatening marine communities, but scientists have found that marine life is flourishing in Antarctic fjords despite warming in the region.

Autosub in ambitious Antarctic mission

Autosub

A team of British scientists is making final preparations for an ambitious science mission that will use the National Oceanography Centre-provided Autosub underwater vehicle to monitor recent ice loss from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

Antarctica’s first whale skeleton found with nine new deep-sea species

Backbone of whale skeleton on seafloor (courtesy of NERC)

Marine biologists have, for the first time, found a whale skeleton on the ocean floor near Antarctica, giving new insights into life in the sea depths. The discovery was made almost a mile below the surface in an undersea crater and includes the find of at least nine new species of deep-sea organisms thriving on the bones.

‘Lost world’ discovered around Antarctic vents

Pillar supporting stalked barnacles and anemones

Communities of species previously unknown to science have been discovered on the seafloor near Antarctica, clustered in the hot, dark environment surrounding hydrothermal vents.

Working from the Royal Research Ship James Cook, scientists discovered new species of yeti crab, starfish, barnacles, sea anemones, and potentially an octopus.

Engineering team heads to Antarctica to explore hidden lake

GPS Station, Lake Ellsworth