marine life

Global climatic change prompts marine life to go on the move

How global climate change will alter the ocean and ecosystems at the heart of global food security over the 21st century has been highlighted by a trio of ground-breaking research papers.

Robots help to map England’s only deep-water Marine Conservation Zone

An orange Roughy in a coral reef taken by the Isis ROV

The first true three-dimensional picture of submarine canyon habitats has been produced using a unique combination of marine robotics and ship-based measurements.

Blue Whale photographed in English waters

The Blue Whale surfacing

An incredibly rare sighting of a Blue Whale in English waters was captured on camera by scientists on-board the RRS James Cook.

The huge mammal, twice as long as a double-decker bus, was spotted on 24 August approximately 400 km southwest of Cornwall, over a deep-sea canyon on the northern margin of the Bay of Biscay.

Arctic study of ocean acidification impacts

RRS James Clark Ross

As the UK approaches summer with high hopes of good weather, a team of adventurous scientists will be setting sail for far chillier climes. Thirty researchers from eight laboratories will leave the UK on 1st June 2012 to study the effect of ocean acidification on the Norwegian, Barents and Greenland Seas

‘Lost world’ discovered around Antarctic vents

Pillar supporting stalked barnacles and anemones

Communities of species previously unknown to science have been discovered on the seafloor near Antarctica, clustered in the hot, dark environment surrounding hydrothermal vents.

Working from the Royal Research Ship James Cook, scientists discovered new species of yeti crab, starfish, barnacles, sea anemones, and potentially an octopus.