deep-sea ecology

High-resolution mapping of deep-sea vertical walls using ocean robots

AUV mapping canyon walls

A new study published by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) combines novel autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) mapping and imaging methodologies to reveal the complex 3D terrain of deep-sea vertical cliffs and the diversity of species associated with them.

Biodiversity loss from Deep-sea mining will be unavoidable

Sea anemone in an abyssal area with polymetallic nodules in the Clarion Clipperton Zone, in the Pacific, at over 4000 m depth

Biodiversity losses from deep-sea mining are unavoidable and possibly irrevocable, an international team of 15 marine scientists and legal scholars argue in a letter published today in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Ocean circulation can impact on the effectiveness of marine protected areas

Researchers at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) studying the UK’s four largest Marine Protected Areas have found that, because of the ocean’s vigorous circulation, even remote, seemingly pristine habitats, are not isolated from human activities, and may be vulnerable to pollution and overfishing impacts.

Seafloor communities may have it worse under climate change

New findings from researchers at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) indicate that seafloor communities will be more impacted by climate change the deeper they are in the ocean.

Deep-sea mining research at the NOC

The National Oceanography Centre (NOC) is engaged in research into the potential risks and benefits of exploiting deep-sea mineral resources, some of which are essential for low-carbon technology, as well as using ocean robots to estimate the environmental impact of these potential deep-sea mining activities.

Whistling wormholes discovered in the Caribbean

Carribean sea

National Oceanography Centre scientists have discovered the Caribbean Sea works like a whistle. This finding will enable scientists to predict some sea level changes many months in advance, and may be an important factor in regulating how the Gulf Stream varies.

RRS James Cook research takes biologist to Parliament

RRS James Cook

Rui Vieira an Ocean and Earth Science PhD student from University of Southampton specialising in deep-sea ecology, biological oceanography and fisheries is attending Parliament to present his research to a range of politicians and a panel of expert judges, as part of SET for Britain on Monday 7 March.

NOC in The Deep

Professor Phil Weaver of the NOC delivers his speech

The National Oceanography Centre (NOC) and the SERPENT project have contributed to a major new exhibition at the Natural History Museum, which opened on Friday 28 May.