deep-sea mining

Biodiversity loss from Deep-sea mining will be unavoidable

Sea anemone in an abyssal area with polymetallic nodules in the Clarion Clipperton Zone, in the Pacific, at over 4000 m depth

Biodiversity losses from deep-sea mining are unavoidable and possibly irrevocable, an international team of 15 marine scientists and legal scholars argue in a letter published today in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Deep-sea mining research at the NOC

The National Oceanography Centre (NOC) is engaged in research into the potential risks and benefits of exploiting deep-sea mineral resources, some of which are essential for low-carbon technology, as well as using ocean robots to estimate the environmental impact of these potential deep-sea mining activities.

Abyssal region of the Pacific reveals species new to science

Pacific xenophyophores

Scientists at the NOC have discovered 34 new species of giant single-celled organisms living at depths of more than 4 km in the eastern equatorial Pacific. The study areas are among those licensed by the International Seabed Authority (ISA) for exploration by companies with an interest in possible future deep-sea mining.

Expedition to test new technologies for deep sea deposit exploration

HyBIS Robotic Underwater Vehicle being prepared for a dive by its inventor, Dr Bramley Murton

Understanding how critical elements are formed in the deep ocean

NOC’s Dr Bramley Murton preparing for a dive mission

UK and Brazilian scientists will be working together to study the formation of critical ocean minerals essential for new technology – particularly environmental technology such as photovoltaic cells.