The Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP) Observatory

PAP logoThe Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP) Observatory is a sustained, multidisciplinary observatory in the North Atlantic coordinated by the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton. For over 20 years the observatory has provided key time-series datasets for analysing the effect of climate change on the open ocean and deep-sea ecosystems.


Upper Ocean

The North Atlantic is made up of a complicated layering of currents going in many different directions

Mid Ocean

The twilight zone is the upper part of the ocean where sunlight is able to penetrate

 

Seabed

Since 1996, an important change has taken place in the numbers of creatures living over a large area of the North Eastern Atlantic sea floor

Latest News and Updates

Good news from the PAP site!

PI Richard Lampitt has confirmed that we now have a GPS beacon on the PAP buoy which is transmitting positional data daily.

Whilst we were of course disappointed not to get our data in real time back on the cruise in May, we were more worried that should the buoy drift for any reason, we would have no way of knowing.

Now we are able to ensure that we know exactly where the buoy is.

This is thanks to a whole collection of teams and individuals who together made it happen.

Miguel Charcos Llorens and Nick Rundle for having the foresight to suggest and identify a beacon, Terry Sloan of Planet Ocean at MARSIC for his next day delivery service of said beacon, Kev Saw, Dan Comben and Robin Brown for making brackets with 3 hours’ notice, Mark Stinchcombe for driving it to Plymouth, Rolly Rogers for coordinating and communicating with the Royal Navy and Lt Butcher and his team on board HMS Scott for making it all happen at sea.

To cap it all, a floating sediment trap which failed to re-surface on a test programme on the May cruise, surfaced and transmitted last week. The Scott also recovered the PELAGRA and it will now be available for its intended cruise in 2017.