Latest news

The latest news articles are listed below.


NOC to support Madagascan adaptation to climate change

NOC scientists will be using global ocean models to identify the most effective way for low income countries, such as Madagascar, to adapt to climate change.

For example, ocean warming model projections will help identify the future risk of coral bleaching, which enables planning for the impact on the fisheries and tourism that depend on the reef.

Technology partnership to provide vital new information to coastal engineers

Coasts

The National Oceanography Centre (NOC) has entered into a two year Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) with Marlan Maritime Technologies Ltd to develop innovative remote sensing services for the survey of intertidal zones.

‘Hidden larder’ for sharks and whales revealed in Welsh waters

Setting out

The mission saw an unmanned underwater glider travel to an area around 50 miles to the south west of Wales called the Celtic Deep, which is a haven for wildlife but also an extremely busy shipping route and fishing ground. The glider travelled 600 km in 30 days, undertaking nearly 3000 dives from the sea surface to the seabed at a depth of 100m.

The risks of carbon dioxide leakage through submarine ‘chimneys’

An image of a submarine chimney structure from the University of Southampton

NOC scientists are playing a key role investigating the risks of leaks from carbon dioxide (CO2) storage reservoirs situated under the seabed.

Science at sea

Current expeditions

RRS James Cook and RRS Discovery are both currently undergoing refit works. See the expedition pages for more information.

International scientific challenges to be addressed in Winchester

Deep, cold water coral image taken by NOC’s ROV

One hundred and sixty scientists will descend on Winchester this week as part of a globally significant meeting to address the challenges in submarine habitat mapping.

Biological insights to help protect coastlines

 Minsmere, one of the case study locations

The first project to investigate the role of biological processes on the future evolution of the UK coastline is expected to produce valuable insights that will shape coastal protection policy. This project, called BLUE-coast, is led by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) alongside nine partner organisations.

£10m investment into autonomous systems

RRS Discovery with some of NOC’s autonomous vehicles in the foreground

The Natural Environment Research Council announced today that it will invest £15m in Marine Autonomous Systems (MAS) and sensors over a five-year development programme.

Collaboration to improve social benefit of oceanography

Example of NOC's ocean modelling

Today a major collaborative programme between the NOC and three of UK’s other leading marine and oceanographic research centres has begun to improve the social and economic benefits of this vital area of science, as well as improving understanding in a more holistic way.

NOC scientists receives EGU award

Professor John Huthnance

NOC’s Professor John Huthnance has been awarded the European Geosciences Union’s prestigious Fridtjof Nansen medal for his outstanding contribution to our understanding of physical processes in coastal and shelf seas, especially in the North Sea, and at the continental shelf break.